Wednesday Vignette – Wine Cups

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This week’s garden vignette is a dreadfully disorganized scramble that was slated for revamping – one of these days.

If ever.

Then it kept raining, raining and raining and everything grew into a heap of lush green foliage with flowers on top of the mess.

DSC_1554 There are two scramblers here – Wine Cups (Callirhoe involucrata) and Clematis ‘Rooguchi’. Most of the plants in this bed had been moved from my old gardens in Glen Ellyn years ago, so the area has functioned more as a holding area than a garden.

So THAT’S my excuse!

DSC_1544There is an Astrantia, a Galium called ‘Victor Jones’, a daylily I picked up on sale and underneath the mess, there HAD BEEN an Oakleaf Hydrangea.

I dare you to find it!

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Another little garden is taking shape in the distance where a decrepit farm gate is getting replaced with a new one constructed of old barn wood.

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I am rather fond of scramblers like Wine Cups for their ability to weave into their neighbors sometimes creating arresting combinations – or sometimes just confusing combinations as you never know what flower belongs to which leaf.

In the prairie it threads its way into Northern Bush Honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera) which, by the way, is NOT a Honeysuckle, nor is it invasive. I have also let it scramble through Wine and Roses Weigela.

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Wine Cups, also called Poppy Mallow, is a member of the mallow family (Hollyhock, and Hibiscus among others) easily recognized by the distinctive flowers.

Wine Cups is drought-tolerant, develops a significant taproot and produces bright magenta flowers all summer long. The color is always clear, never muddy as is common with magenta colored flowers. Native range includes Missouri, Oklahoma, Texas with scattered populations in Illinois.

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Hey, I think I can spot the Hydrangea in this shot!

Flowering can be prolonged by removing old flowers before they set seed. Mine have never seeded. If yours have, please comment!

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Hurry up – time to get this posted!

Whew – what a workout! I think I’ll take a nap now.

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Wednesday Vignette — Pale Indian Plaintain

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Pale Indian Plantain (Cacalia atriplicifolia) is not something you are going to run across at your local garden center. It is a Midwestern native found in rocky woodlands, thickets and wet meadows throughout Illlinois, “conspicuous but uncommon” according to Swink and Wilhelm. I obtained a few from my friend Victor and scattered them about just to see what they would do, this being the only one to bloom this year.

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What a lovely thing it has turned out to be, conspicuous to be sure, and not just in flower. Leaves and stems are thick and leathery. Leaves are blue-gray in color while the stems and petioles display a purple cast. Creamy white flowers exude an aroma like vanilla.

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Forgive the blur — I haven’t quite mastered the macro feature of my camera.

A couple years back I rolled a hollow log into this bed that consists of nothing more than a jumble of Bittersweet clambering up an electric pole. There is an old gate and chair hiding in the jumble, along with Kitty.

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Prairie Dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepsis) and Foxglove Beardtongue (Penstemon digitalis) are nearby companions. Alas, the snowplow almost demolished the old log last winter.

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It appears that deadheading will extend the bloom. Right now I am content to watch the show.